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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 3, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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this is bbc news from bbc news with sally baldock and ben thompson. creeping closer to a deal — talks between the us and china resume today in a bid to end the bitter trade war. live from london, that's our top good morning — welcome to breakfast story on wednesday the 3rd of april. with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: rolling back her red lines — theresa may appeals tojeremy corbyn to break the brexit deadlock. pushing for a breakthrough on brexit: theresa may prepares to meet labour leaderjeremy corbyn in a last—ditch bid to find a way forward. reports say that a deal is imminent and chinese delegates are in lam i am offering to sit down with the washington today to continue those trade negotiations. we will talk you leader of the opposition and agree toa through the sticking points left leader of the opposition and agree to a plan that we can both stick to tackle. also in the programme, it is and leave the european union with the deal. but as conservative trial time in a scandal that sent brexiteers cry betrayal can shock waves she keep her party together? and the honey bees that could hold than answer to one of the biggest threats to human health.
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the gamble backfires. two bettings firms pull games from high street stores after claims they've been designed to get round new regulations. fulham have been relegated back to the championship despite spending one hundred million pounds on players last summer. good morning. today, for northern england and scotland and northern ireland, we got to rain and/or hill snow moving westwards. windy and cold as well. the rest of england and wales, sunshine and showers and hail and thunder. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, april 3. our top story. theresa may is likely to meet the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, today to try to agree a joint plan to end the brexit deadlock. after more than seven hours of fractious talks with her cabinet, the prime minister said she would be asking the eu for a further short extension beyond the 12th of april, in an attempt to secure britain's exit with a deal. conservative brexiteers have reacted angrily to mr corbyn‘s involvement —
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as our political correspondent, chris mason, reports. ina tribal in a tribal place like westminster, asking the opposition to help is far from normal and transparent acknowledgement of weakness but the prime minister has concluded she has run out of better ideas in her determination to deliver brexit. run out of better ideas in her determination to deliver brexiti am taking action to break the logjam. i'm offering to sit down with the leader of the opposition and to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to ensure that we leave the european union and that we do so with the deal. i'm very happy to meet her. we need to have a discussion with the prime minister. we need to ensure that parliament has an opportunity to vote on proposals that prevent us crashing out of the eu at the end of next week. some conservatives think the prime minister ‘s strategy is bizarre, reaching out to someone in jeremy corbyn, with the tories have
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been attempting to portray is not fit to govern. but this is also a big moment for the labour leader. his manifesto committed him to delivering exit and now he has that chance but there will also be the political temptation to leave the prime minister precisely where she is, running out of options and running out of time. chris mason, bbc news. we'll get the latest from adam fleming in brussels in just a moment, but first let's get more details on the prime minister's plan from our political correspondent nick eardley. good morning once again. what sort of path do you think she is trying to plot in the next few weeks and months? down, we were saying yesterday, it was only yesterday, that these things move so quickly, and brexit develops so fast, that what she is going to try and do over the next few days, this is all about the next few days, this is all about the future relationship. it's not about how we leave. the prime
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minister thinks that part is sorted but she is offering to meetjeremy corbyn in the next few days to try and thrash out some sort of agreement about what happens after that. what a future relationship with the eu looks like. there are some sceptical here that they will agree and if they don't come the pm is saying that any options that they come to will be put to mps, kind of like the indicative votes we've seen so like the indicative votes we've seen so far but crucially, the government is saying they will abide by anything the house of commons decides. they want to get this all done by the 22nd of may. basically a prime minister has decided she can't get that through simply with her own party. and with her partners in the du p, she is going to try and get them onside but that is infuriating some her own party. borisjohnson
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has said she handed the initiative to labour. others are angry about this. there is going to be a lot of pressure from the pm on her own side as well. adam fleming has reaction from brussels. i imagine they been intrigued. for months and months, the eu has been saying to theresa may, we don't have enough votes. you're going to look to the other side and reach out to the labour party. better late than never is what guy verhofstadt had to say and the questions in brussels on the same as in the uk. is this cross— party same as in the uk. is this cross—party process actually going to work? is it going to lead to anything that can be agreed by parliament? can both political parties, labour and the conservatives, actually survive
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working together on this visit going to end up with another series of those indicative votes in the house of commons where mps just have to choose from some options? this idea of cross—party consensus was first suggested by the danish prime minister who tweeted last night, is this too good to be true? eu leaders going to wait and see and they got until wednesday night to make a decision. decide whether there is going to be a brexit extension. short or long. as nick said, hanging over all of this is the elections which the uk would have been taking pa rt which the uk would have been taking part in in the 23rd of may. it's ha rd to part in in the 23rd of may. it's hard to see the uk staying in the eu pass that date. so many dates to think about. prisons in england and wales
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are in deep crisis according to a report by mps. they say there's been increase in overcrowding caused by the use of longer sentences and cuts to funding. they've found the number of prison places has not kept pace with demand. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. we are in hmp birmingham... overcrowded and underfunded and increasingly unsafe. mps on the justice select committee say something must be done about our prisons. there has been a string of riots behind bars. the pressure is so riots behind bars. the pressure is so great, building more prisons is no longer a sustainable solution according to today's report. the number of inmates has fallen slightly in recent years but only after growing steadily for 25 years, 44,019 93 to 82,000 in 2018. because more criminals are being jailed for longer. in the last five years, budgets have been cut by 15% in the ministry ofjustice estimates that closing the funding gap would mean
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cutting the prison population by 20,000. it is a fifth. mps say the system is failing staff, prisoners and the public, would stubbornly high reoffending rates. they are failing on all of those measures and that's basically because we don't have a strategy for managing the size of our prison population and we've got more people in the institutions than we can realistically and constructively deal with. the report says is in sentences of less than 12 months should be replaced with community service. the government is looking at scrapping 6— month prison sentences and making community service more stringent. meanwhile it's also planning to deliver 10,000 more prison places. tom symons, bbc news. nine of the vessels still contain nuclearfuel, according to the government spending watchdog, the national audit office. it said failing to get rid of them risked the uk's reputation as a responsible nuclear power. the mod said it would
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dispose of them "as soon as practically possible". the parents of a woman who killed herself at a mental health hospital say failings in her care were "unbelievable." claire greaves from pontypool was a patient at cygnet hospital in coventry. in february an inquest found a series of care failings contributed to her death. paul martin reports. asa as a child, they described me as fussy, picky, choosy. that in my mind, iwas fussy, picky, choosy. that in my mind, i was weak, bad and that. claire g reaves mind, i was weak, bad and that. claire greaves described invisibly detailed the reality of life with anorexia and a personality disorder. she was a campaigner, a role that took her to the breakfast sofa where she explained what it was like to be keptin she explained what it was like to be kept ina she explained what it was like to be kept in a police cell because a mental health that was unavailable. i was absolutely terrified of the time. it made the situation a lot worse at a time when i was hoping to
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get better. but while campaigning for better mental health services for better mental health services for others, her own struggle continued. in 2017, she was moved to this new specialist hospital in coventry. despite being assessed as high risk, she was able to kill herself and her hospital room. but an inquestjury did not decide clea r‘s an inquestjury did not decide clear‘s death was suicide. they reached an open conclusion and said that failings here at signet contributed to clear‘s death. among them, clear‘s observation levels we re them, clear‘s observation levels were not increased despite her making several self—harm attempt in the days before she died in her care plan wasn't followed, which meant she was alone in her room when she took her own life. it seems unbelievable but that can happen. they got the systems in place to make sure that they manage the out ca re make sure that they manage the out care properly but the failings were quite shocking. signet healthcare says it's making a number of changes following recommendations made at the inquest. paul martin, bbc news.
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—— cygnet. viewers in wales can see more on that story at 10.30 tonight on bbc one wales. the rest of the uk will be able to watch it on the iplayer. sally is here talking about the first team to have exited the premier league this season. it's the business end of the season, really, and we talk so much about what's happening at the top but today we have to bring you news from the other premier league because you probably remember, last summer, fulham spent more money on players than any promoted club but it wasn't enough to keep them in the amir league. — premier league. they lost 4—1 to watford to confirm their relegation with five games remaining, despite forking out £100 million on transfers. meanwhile, it's been going better for another promoted side. wolves beat manchester united — a bizarre own goal from chris smalling settled it after ashley young was sent off. united stay outside the top four. the women's national teams of england,
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scotland, wales and northern ireland have agreed a multi—million pound sponsorship deal with the chemist, boots. it's the first deal the national teams have done which is completely separate from the men's sides. and for most of yesterday's formula 1 testing session they were all chasing a schumacher in a ferrari. michael's son mick was driving for his dad's old team. he ended up second fastest. we've got more from him coming up in the paper review injust a minute. we will be talking about what happened yesterday and how good he could potentially be. and you are out and about today. can you tell from what i'm wearing? i got seven layers on. i got louise's code, going outside in a bit plain that all with 100 girls have come here to celebrated making 100 days until the net for world cup in liverpool. you got tracy noble, the head coach with you. and 100 girls playing. are you
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playing? i might do. come and join us. playing? i might do. come and join us. i didn't bring my trainers. i played, i was wing attack on the goal attack. i did look last night to see if i could find my antique bib. what colour? read. i don't know ifi bib. what colour? read. i don't know if i ever had a bib. i was goal attack. you never had a bib? not to keep. i wasn't sure if i was meant to keep it. let's find out what the weather is like for you. carole, good morning. i hope you are changing your tunes before you go out. it is a cold start of the day. sally ‘s right to wrap up this morning. ahead, a cold day with windchill in the north making it feel colder than the temperatures i'm about to show you. currently, some snow in the forecast. eight
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centimetres in northern england. some parts seeing two or three centimetres. it's all going on. you can see how the cold air is indicated by the blues. right across the uk. some sparkly cloud. it's this area across the north of scotla nd this area across the north of scotland we are looking it. also into northern england. some falling snow as well. elsewhere, some hill snow. most of it is above 300m. the area of low pressure bringing this to us is further west. taking rain until snow with it. rain in northern ireland by the afternoon. showers getting into northern parts of wales. showers becoming more widespread through the course of the afternoon. breezy in the south, windy and the north and this is where we'll have a significant windchill. these are our temperatures, ranging from about 7-9. but if
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temperatures, ranging from about 7—9. but if you add on the effects of the wind. it will feel more like 2-4d. of the wind. it will feel more like 2—4d. definitely if you are just heading out, you don't know what to wear, put something warm in today. through the evening and overnight, the low pressure scented with down towards ireland and wales. everything in anticlockwise direction. you can see the amount of showers rain we are looking it. we do have clear skies, the temperature will drop. once again, some frost. under the clear skies, we can see some mr fogg patches. as the low pressure continues to slink a little bit further south, you can also see we've got weather fronts wrapped around it. still, looking at some rain across the north of the country and also some hill snow, and just in scotla nd and also some hill snow, and just in scotland but in northern england. as we come further south, once again, heavy showers which will be wintry
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but something drier and brighter tomorrow across central and eastern areas. it still below par for the time of year. it's not going to be as cold. mostly dry and there will be some sunshine but equally cloud as well. on friday, low pressure sinks down. you can make out the south—west of england. all the area around it coming up from spain and france. that is a milder direction for us and you can see quite a bit of mild weather away from still the circulation around the low pressure, we have some alien parts of northern ireland, wales and the south—west. temperatures 11, 12 or even up to 14 any fuel wondering about the weekend, more settled, and easterly at times, so there will be a fair
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bit of cloud coming in from the west. thank you very much, i loved all the warnings in that forecast. thank you. the top of 14, so it should be quite chilly. i'm glad i brought my coat. and i'm changing my shoes actually, i have got my pumps outside. let's take a look at the papers. the daily telegraph features 14 ministers who are back to no—deal brexit, accusing the prime minister of having ignored the clear majority and speculates that there could be resignations. metro says it isjezz the two of us,
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making reference to theresa may's decision to meet withjeremy corbyn to discuss the way forward for brexit. and the sun saying is that your bright idea? pictured with a lightbulb. and across social media, duke and duchess of sussex have launched their own instagram account. @sussexroyal is the official account for harry and meghan, it will be used for "important announcements" and to share pictures of their work. it already has nearly 2 million followers. a strong start that, isn't it? strong stars. —— a strong start. the first post included images of the royal couple watching a sailing competition at the invictus games, meghan embracing women at a charity event for those affected by the grenfell tower fire, and meeting fans in australia. do you think that is where they will announce the birth? it will be one of those days when the paper comes outside the palace and... the modern
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world, hey? i'm sure there will be hundreds and hundreds of news crews outside a hospital somewhere, waiting for that first view. do you wa nt waiting for that first view. do you want some good news? dark chocolate really is good for us. are you not a fan? no, no, i am more ofa really is good for us. are you not a fan? no, no, i am more of a milkman. really? chocolate containing 90% cocoa leads to biggest drop in blood pressure, but it says just do not eat too much and that is where i go wrong. -- but it says. just do not eat too much, 20g wrong. -- but it says. just do not eat too much, 20 g not very much, is it? you know how sally was talking about birds doing quite a lot of sponsorship, it is interesting because they are in the business pages for different reasons today and that is because they are not doing particularly well. you might remember they were brought by big american chain and they have said that they might close some stores in the uk because they have suffered the uk because they have suffered the most difficult quarter since its
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formation, from this megamerger, it was a massive thing when walgreens joined the boots allianz in 2014 and it is saying it isjust really tough market conditions out there at the moment, so interesting to see what will happen there because it is a big chain in the uk, it employs a lot of people. —— boots aliiance. they body said they're going to slash the number of people, the headcount at the nottingham headquarters, so interesting to see how they deal with this. headquarters, so interesting to see how they deal with thislj headquarters, so interesting to see how they deal with this. i mentioned mick schumacher in the sport, and i just want to show you this picture because if we go in a little bit, there's something about the set of hisjaw that is there's something about the set of his jaw that is so like there's something about the set of hisjaw that is so like his dad, michael. mick schumacher, who of course, rememberl michael. mick schumacher, who of course, remember i have set in the sport, he clocked the second fastest time in his formula 1 debut, that was yesterday. he is testing for ferrari in bahrain, that was his mother there watching him, some of the papers have pictures of her watching him, looking really worried and nervous. he is looking really
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like his dad. two other ones for you, lemur yoga, anyone? we have done alpaca yoga. the primates are happy tojoin in and done alpaca yoga. the primates are happy to join in and they actually sort of mimic... they do, animals to do that. when i do yoga at home, my dog doesjoin in. she does a downward dog. honestly. when i am doing whatever, crunches, my dog tries to do it. can you get some photos of your dogs in action? yeah, we'll do some dog yoga, definitely. look forward to that. have you ever done anything inspired by the power of adrenaline? a lot, every day. there is a mother he who wrestled a mountain lion away from her son, so she heard a son screaming, her
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seven—year—old son screaming in the garden. she went outside, this was in vancouver island and she heard him screaming and she saw a cougar had pinned her son on the floor on his arm, so she just set upon the cougar and somehow managed to prise open his doors. brilliant. it is amazing what you can do... my sister, when she was much younger, we we re sister, when she was much younger, we were in the car together and she sat on the driver's said, she turned the engine on and she drove our car straight into another car. my mother was outside of the car at the time, right? how was your sister? i my head down in the glove compartment, i remember that. ithink head down in the glove compartment, i remember that. i think my sister must‘ve been about 15, 16, so my... quite bad. my entire family, no—one believes this to my entire family when the car and my mum went ballistic, as you can imagine, she crashed into this car, she lifted the other car to one side to move
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away. brilliant, yeah. superhuman. amazing. who did? your sister or your mum? my mum lifted the car away on her own. and so your mom was not in the carat on her own. and so your mom was not in the car at the time? keys to the car to my sister, she had gotten in and drove into the other car. did you get into trouble? it was our next—door neighbour that knew well, but she was in massive trouble for the next ten years. never allowed to drive again. anyway, see you later, sally, you are heading out soon. you need a bit of adrenaline, don't you? i've got plenty, have a bit too much. let's tell you about one of the other stories we have for you this morning. antibiotic resistance has been called "the greatest threat to human health" in the 21st century by scientists. public health england say the problem is primarily down to the drugs
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being over prescribed, meaning they become less effective at fighting dangerous bacteria. now a team of researchers believe there may be hope, in the form of honey. tim muffett reports. i was gravely ill, gravely ill stop by when debbie contracted a urinary tract infection, she assumed antibiotics would take care of it but things went downhill fast. -- when debbie contracted. but things went downhill fast. -- when debbie contractedlj but things went downhill fast. -- when debbie contracted. i developed sepsis, where your body kinda goes into overdrive and it attacks itself, they started pumping antibiotics into me and then as each day passed, they found that that antibiotic was not working and was deteriorating down day. why weren't those antibiotics working? they found that i had anti—microbial resistance, it is becoming more and more alarming, which is what the alarming thing is and why they have to do some. anti—microbial resista nce to do some. anti—microbial resistance is what happened when microorganisms such as these evolve and antibiotics can no longer kill
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them. anti-microbial resistance is predicted to kill more people than cancer by 2050 and if we get to the stage and we have no working antibiotics, it would essentially mean the end of modern medicine. research needs to clear up the question of why can bacteria not surviving a beehive? one of the main reasons for that is the natural antimicrobial properties of honey. honey has been used as a treatment for infection for centuries, it contains natural antibiotics, which can kill bacteria. the problem is, it is sticky, which means it is very difficult to use in surgery or on a wound. we are taking it from something that is thick and sticky and turning it into sprays, creams, and turning it into sprays, creams, and powders, that can be easily applied to lots of different parts of the body. honey based medical gel has already been developed. the team here want to take that idea further. this is our simulated wound, it is killing the bacteria. here we have
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our motion that has got the droplets of the honey and this could be used preve ntively of the honey and this could be used preventively as well, so before a surgeon makes an incision. would that work potentially as well as an antibiotic prescribed by doctor? yeah, so this is an alternative to using antibiotic and what is really promising about this honey is that it has already been shown to kill bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as the superbug, mrsa is. the six antibiotics tried on debbie did work, but she very nearly died and she welcomes another approach to fighting infection. part of being a survivor is the fact that so many people do not make it. we have to support research so that we find other method of treating infections. it is hoped that if funding is found, these products will be brought to medical trial in the next few years. tim muffett, bbc news. we are talking about the power of adrenaline another power of honey.
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thing is honey has been around for an awful long time, people have been using it for years and years. yes, i know. -- the thing is. because i was reading about in a war zone, if you can get honey spay, and cover a wound, that could keep going for a while until you then get treatment later on. excellent, iwas while until you then get treatment later on. excellent, i was going to tell you what is on the programme that we have not got time. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. back shortly. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. the teenager has been charged with the murder of a driver who was stabbed to death in his car near clapham, tube station. —— clapham common tube station. gavin garraway, who was 40, was attacked last friday. 18—year—old zion chiata is due to appear before magistrates later. a 14—year—old boy and 19—year—old ma, who were arrested on suspicion of murder, have been released under investigation.
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extra police officers have been called tackle advising violent crime in harlow in essex. they‘ re among several thousand people who've been placed in temporary housing. there are particular concerns around one converted office block, called terminus house. we are creating real issues here for your putting vulnerable people with young children in accommodation directly adjacent to people that are involved in drugs and drug supply. my involved in drugs and drug supply. my view is, and has been from the outset, that i think these companies need to look at the vetting of the people they are putting in and they need to take some responsibility around the placements of certain individuals. caridon property — who run the office block — told us it would take action against anyone dealing drugs or causing a nuisance. it has cost £1 billion and arrived more than six months late. but tonight, tottenham's new stadium is officially opened with a premier league game against crystal palace. it holds more than 62,000 fans — making it the biggest club stadium in london.
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let's ta ke let's take a look now the travel. it is all looking good so far on the tube. no problems reported on any of those lines this morning. let's take a look at the m25, it is busy clockwise. the usual rush—hour delays but not helped by vehicle that has broken down. some roadworks to tell you about. time for the weather now. good morning. it is a cold start out that this morning, one or two spots are bound zero, if not below. you might just get a bit of frost first thing but it is going to say cold today the chance of one or two showers as well. out towards the east, you might geta well. out towards the east, you might get a rumble of thunder and hail in the heavier showers. elsewhere, some sunny spells but is going to feel quite cold today,
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temperature is not even making double figures, around eight or nine celsius. overnight tonight, that show is still around, over higher ground they could fall wintry, you might geta ground they could fall wintry, you might get a bit of sleet and hail mixed in. under the clear skies, temperatures again dropping down to zero, may be below, you might to see a bit my morning. a chilly start thursday, some sunny spells, still some showers and temperatures again on the cold side. they do make a bit ofa on the cold side. they do make a bit of a recovery as we head towards friday, more of recovery as we head through the weekend. some sunny spells and temperatures back up at about 14 or 15 celsius. we'll be back in about half—an—hour, a website has plenty news, travel and weather. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment,
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but also on breakfast this morning we'll be hearing how this incredible commonweath gold for england's netball team has inspired more than 100,000 women to dust off their trainers and get back on court. he's one of the biggest latin rock stars on the planet — carlos santana will be here to talk new music, live shows, and returning to woodstock 50 years after his monumental performance there in 1969. and attention all men over 40 — we'll be bringing you advice from one of britain's most respected nutritionists, who wants more men to take an interest in healthy eating. good morning — here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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the prime minister is likely to meet jeremy corbyn to agree on a joint plan to end the brexit deadlock. after more than seven hours of fractious talks with her cabinet, the prime minister said she would be asking the eu for a further short extension beyond the 12th of april in an attempt to secure britain's exit with a deal. conservative brexiteers reacted angrily to mr corbyn's involvement, but some cabinet ministers backed theresa may's course of action. it is important that the leader of the opposition recognises that the labour party manifesto committed labour party manifesto committed labour to honouring the referendum resulted it's important that all of us resulted it's important that all of us in the house of commons do everything we can in order to ensure we leave the european union at the earliest possible opportunity. prisons in england and wales are at risk of overcrowding. the cross—party justice select committee has found the number of prison places has not kept pace with demand, and says the government must reduce the number of criminals put behind bars. the government said it wants to deliver 10,000 more prison places.
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not doing what part of the purpose of prisoners, not just not doing what part of the purpose of prisoners, notjust to keep the public safe, that's critical and just to punish, and that's critical to but also to reform and rehabilitate and we are failing on all of those measures and that's basically because we don't have a strategy for managing the size of our prison population and we have got more people in the institutions than we can realistically and constructively deal with. the pa rents of constructively deal with. the parents of a woman who killed herself in a mental health hospital say that failings were unbelievable. claire greaves from pontypool was a patient at cygnet hospital in coventry. in february an inquest found a series of care failings contributed to her death. cygnet healthcare says it's making a number of changes following recommendations made at the inquest. hundreds of thousands of people who were mis—sold payday loans will receive a fraction of the compensation they are entitled to after a lender collapsed. wageday advance had given loans to about
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800,000 people but went into administration earlier this year. customers who paid off loans but were due compensation will now only get a fraction of the full amount. the authorities in peru have opened an investigation into suspicious death of a british missionary and environmental activist. paul mcauley, who was 71, was found dead on tuesday in the city of iquitos in the amazon. his body had reportedly been burned. a suspect in the murder of los angeles rapper nipsey hussle has been held by police. eric holder had been on the run since the weekend after fleeing the scene of the fatal shooting. hussle was killed outside his clothing store on saturday following a ‘verbal altercation' with the suspect. the artist was nominated for best rap album at this year's grammy awards. sally has got a very big netball match coming up. it is me against
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100. i think i have tracey neville on my side so everything is ok. it's 100 days until the start of the netball world cup. why is it all over there? netball world cup. why is it all overthere? i netball world cup. why is it all over there? i don't know. do you know what? i'm not allowed to touch it. sorry, you can only touch it with the appropriate gloves. that's why it's being kept away from me. we have all sorts of trophies on this table, don't we? and that one has to be all the way over there. what about the banana, is that the fa cup? anyway, so that trophy we are looking at very carefully. it's very precious. starting there with football. the miserable night for fulham. fulham have been relegated
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from the premier league—despite spending £100 million on players last summer. their 4—1defeat to watford last night rounded off a miserable season. patrick gearey reports on where it all went wrong. any excuse for a party but this was one of them spent more than £100 billion trying to avoid. their relegation, proof that money can't buy premier league safety. the ending was macular. they managed to go into half—time 1—1 before watford put the first nail in the coffin. the story of the season followed, defence with the usual holes. the third was scored and then four. the 76th league goal of conceded this season. we all realised when you get relegated from this division, there is some serious problems, or serious issues what have gone on. i'm sure at the right time in the right moment, we will all sit down and
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obviously worked out where mistakes are made. the plan was so different. for them spent more money lost some than any promoted side but having raided they found out not much really fitted them. their unsettled side were bottom of the table when the manager was stacked. they brought in claudio ranieri, famous molester, but such success is hard to repeat. the problems it seems from deeper. we have not shown a togetherness, unity, a desire, passion. everything that the manager stands for. money won't be the a nswer stands for. money won't be the answer this summer and a club so used to spending must work out what it can save. patrick geary, bbc news. it's been a very different season for another promoted side, wolves. they beat manchester united two—one thanks to this bizarre own goal
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from chris smalling. united had ashley young sent off earlier and stay outside the top four. yesterday rugby union side saracens announced they'd also play some matches there. the project's been hit by delays but tottenham think it will be a game—changer on and off the pitch. itjust keeps getting worse for them at the moment— yesterday the local council banned supporters from attending their ground because of safety issues and the club's players have been on strike because the staff haven't been paid. i think as far as the players are concerned, we're all excited i have every confidence. one of the oldest football clu bs every confidence. one of the oldest football clubs in britain 012p in unpaid tax. itjust keeps getting worse for them at the moment yesterday the local council banned supporters from attending
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their ground because of safety issues and the club's players have been on strike because the staff haven't been paid. the firm is also backing the republic of ireland. it's the first time the national sides have signed a sponsorship agreement independent of the men's teams. yesterday, schumacher drove a ferrari in formula 1 testing. michael's son. he is 20. the 20 year old was often around the sport while his dad was involved and has come through ferrari's academy. it seems he's pretty good—schumacher junior went second quickest in yesterday's testing in bahrain. the england cricketer alex hales accept this is a role model and wa nts to accept this is a role model and wants to learn from his part in a ball outside a nightclub in 2017. hales faced no criminal charges over the incident but was punished by english cricket's governing body.
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and speaking at a charity event to inspire young people to play cricket, he told us what he's learned. how much we are in the public eye as england cricketer are not put yourself into a situation in the middle of a situation in the middle of the series at 230 game is probably not the place you want to be as an international sportsman so i would say being a bit more mature and sensible with decisions. so that is just about it from me. time to tell you that in the last few moments, we've been given special permission to do one very important thing. the gloves of doom. walker has got the gloves. there are a bit grubby, to be fair. a little bit marcel marceau for use reveal the trophy. look at that. 100 days until this is handed out. the current holders are australia. 2015
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won by australia. trophy made in birmingham in the 19905, solid silver. birmingham in the 19905, solid 5ilver. it'5 heavy. careful, don't wobble it. it's 5ecure. 5ilver. it'5 heavy. careful, don't wobble it. it's secure. 100 days until this is complete and liveable. the next time you see me in, i will be outside in our bbc activi5t netball court. don't union now. there is no news yet on whether eu leaders will agree to the new brexit deadline. we'll get reaction from our
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correspondent in brussels in just a minute, but first let's hear how theresa may described her plan to break the deadlock last night. i've just i'vejust come from i've just come from chairing seven hours of cabinet meetings, focused on finding a route out from the current impasse. i know there are some who are so fed up with delay and are that they would like to leave with no deal. but leaving will be the best solution. one that is as short as possible and ends when we passed the deal. despite the best effo rts passed the deal. despite the best efforts of mps, the process that the house of commons has tried to lead has not come out with an answer. said today, i'm taking action to break the logjam. i'm offering to sit down with the leader of the opposition to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to ensure that we would both stick to ensure that we would both stick to ensure that we leave the european union.
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this is a decisive moment in the story of these islands and it requires national unity to deliver the national interest. so that was theresa may speaking yesterday. let's speak now to our reporter adam fleming. sort of outline of the plan from the prime minister which, and she is trying to get through with support of her own party, she switched her focus across the house to the labour party. how has that gone down with some of the bigwigs in europe? people are pretty happy about it because the eu has been saying to theresa may for months and months, you do not have enough votes for this deal on your own side. there are going to have to reach out to the other side. that's the sort of thing that happens in lots of parliaments when they do their politics of differently. we had a tweet last night from guy verhofstadt, the brexit co—ordinator for the european parliament who said better late than never, he always
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has a sick ——is zinger ready. also from donald tusk. it's on—screen. it's important to decode donald tusk‘s tweets. that is him saying, theresa mayjust saying she will talk tojeremy corbyn is not enough for the eu, they want to see it. let us be patient. hold your horses, let's wait and see what this leads to, don't rush tojudgement. wait and see what this leads to, don't rush to judgement. there are a few eu leaders who are not convinced about the brexit extension. theresa may has asked for an extension. it's going to be factored into this. the first date to think about is the
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10th of april. they will say yes to an extension, long or short, or no to an extension. if they say no to an extension, the next important date would be the 12th of april. next friday, that is when the uk would leave without a deal. the next day to think about is the 23rd of may, that's when the european parliament elections are scheduled to ta ke parliament elections are scheduled to take place across europe. if the uk is still in the eu at that point, people probably have to take part in those european parliament elections, u nless those european parliament elections, unless the deal is past and it's about to leave very soon after that. the next day to think about is a big question mark. it will be what is the last maximum endpoint that any extension would set? that could be six months, nine months, one year. some people even talked about it being at the end of 2020 but that
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idea of such a long extension has disappeared. what i love about you adam fleming is that you celebrated your birthday with an emergency exit cast that people can listen to. on your birthday. dedication. i recorded it in bed because i started off the day really early but the others were working really late so i had to stay at mega late to do it. i had to stay at mega late to do it. i had a late night for my birthday, not the one you would expect. we know that you are safely tucked up in bed. if you haven't listened to brexitcast, which you can find on bbc sounds, it's a wonderful way to have an intricate explanation of all the twists and turns of what happens during this exit.. adam is honoured, chris mason, laura kuenssberg and katya adler. carol is going to have a look at
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this morning's whether, you want to set the hail. that was quite something, wasn't it? it certainly was. good morning, everyone, there is hail in the forecast again today. it is going to be a chilly day for some of us, significant windchill, you can see ahead of that rain and snow. there will be some hail, like yesterday, and also some thunder and lightning. you can see all this beckley cloud, these are showers that we have got something more significant coming scotland and northern england in particular at the moment. —— ‘s —— speckly. that is all going to be drifting westwards a cross is all going to be drifting westwards across scotland and northern england as we go through the course of the day, as it gets into northern ireland, it is going to be largely rain you can see quite aof to be largely rain you can see quite a of showers. it is going to be
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heavy with hail and thunder, it is a busy day in the south but gusty winds, as we currently have and will continue to do so through the day across the north and west. these are the temperatures that you may see in your thermometer, seven to nine degrees when you out on the strength of the wind, it will feel colder than that. we're looking at two and three, maybe four as we pushed down towards the south—west. if you are just stepping out, make sure you ta ke just stepping out, make sure you take something warm with you. heading onto the evening and overnight, the low pressure which is dominating our weather today slips further south. he was the centre of it today, everything around the low pressure m oves it today, everything around the low pressure moves in an anticlockwise direction, so we have got this well of cloud and showers, and this mean across scotland. we will still see some hill snow across the highlands and temperature wise, it is going to be cold once again, there is foster we have got clear skies. see some mist and fog patches form particularly in eastern england and they could well be some slippery surfaces, like this morning. on
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thursday, the low pressure is still very much with us, it is slowly sipping a little bit further south. we still have a weather front across the far north of scotland, that is still producing some rain in the far north of scotland. it is coming in across northern england. —— slipping. abound the centre of the low pressure, we still also have a circulation of showers, again some of those could be wintry on the heels of wales, maybe on the moors as well. temperature wise, in the dry, sunny conditions for central and eastern areas, it will be a bit higher but still feeling pretty cool out towards the west and temperatures generally wherever you are still below average for this time of year. —— hills. as we head towards the end of the week, it is not going to be as cold. it will be largely dry with some sunshine as alcohol pressure begins to sink further south. —— is a low pressure. we change our wind direction to more
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ofa we change our wind direction to more of a south—easterly as a weather front comes in from the continent, so still some rain in the forecast much more in the way of dry weather and lower temperatures. thank you very much. i saw some lovely hail yesterday, i would love to see some more pictures of snow as well. send them in. thank you. the world's largest amphibian has a new home at london zoo. four chinese giant salamanders were stopped by the uk border force, in an attempt to smuggle them into the country. the zoo took in the critically endangered species and now one of them will be on show to the public. our science correspondent rebecca morelle has had an exclusive look. a bizarre looking beast, meet london zoo's latest resident, chinese giant salamander, which reach nearly six feet long, making it the biggest amphibian on the planners. —— which can reach. today it is being moved
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toa can reach. today it is being moved to a new enclosure. “— can reach. today it is being moved to a new enclosure. —— planners. the salamander is very young, far from fully grown, so quick way in and thenit fully grown, so quick way in and then it is swapped to check its health. this animal has already been on quite a journey, it was discovered after an attempt to smuggle it into the uk. discovered after an attempt to smuggle it into the uki discovered after an attempt to smuggle it into the uk. i was amazed when i got the call from uk border force and actually seeing these critically endangered amphibians being smuggled illegally really hit us hard because they are a species that we have dedicated so much effort to conserve in the wild. that we have dedicated so much effort to conserve in the wildm is such a rare chance to see a creature like this up close. these animals were once widespread across china, but they were taken from the streams that they live in and bed in farms for their meat. a recent survey found that there are now nearly any of them left in the wild. —— barely. chinese giant salamanders a living fossils, virtually unchanged since the time of the
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dinosaurs. —— are living fossils. they are unlike any other animal on the planet but it is this uniqueness thatis the planet but it is this uniqueness that is making them so highly sought after. the trade of wildlife his wife throughout the world and i think species like the chinese giant salamander become rarer, they can actually place more demand on the trade of a species, so anything that creates more pressure on amphibians in the wild is going to be detrimental to their future survival. at london zoo, it is time to move the salamander. the hope is to move the salamander. the hope is to eventually create a breeding population, but highly territorial, for now it is in the tank alone. they do not have scales, they have soft skin... it is a chance for the public to learn about one of nature's giants, even if it is a little shy, when it gets used to its new home. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
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is just isjust an is just an extraordinary story that, isn't it? that they survived as well. i would like to know more about the smuggling attempt and where they were found. they have all survived and what is going to be on show, so we're going to see it. it is great to see it on activist this morning. —— on breakfast. two betting firms have pulled games from their high street stores, after claims they were designed to get round new regulations. steph's got more on this. yes, this is about new fixed odds betting machines and that is the machines you often get in the betting shops, that can be very addictive. on monday, the maximum sta ke you addictive. on monday, the maximum stake you could get on them was cut from £100 to £2 by the government, in order to reduce the amount of money that people could quickly spend on them. yesterday, two bookmakers withdrew new games after criticism that they had been designed to get around this system because one of them had a maximum of £100, the other of £500. with me now
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isa £100, the other of £500. with me now is a senior lecturer at leicestershi re is a senior lecturer at leicestershire university, she has been a senior expert on gambling for a decade now, see certainly know your stuff. just explain why they are arguing. they are not fixed odds, they are lottery competitions, so what would you say? —— lincolnshire university. the thing is it is really similar, the gambling industry is really aware of the sort of things encourage people to carry on playing. if you are going to bet on a horse race, horse races not run every three minutes, so yes, it is true that these machines are slower because they are play every 20 seconds but every three minutes are still pretty fast, similarly the amounts of money that you could spend, industry is well aware that the government was concerned that people were losing a lot of money very rapidly and again, you can see that if you can stake
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£500 every three minutes, you can rapidly lose a whole month's salary and more, so those of the two key of them is in the gambling commission has come down on the very hard. doesn't make a difference that it was a system we have to go to the counter then, rather than playing on the machine? because then staff will be aware of how much money was being spent. well, actually, that is quite disingenuous from the industry because when people are playing on a machine, they are actually supposed to keep an eye on them and see how much people are losing. we have seen massive fines in the last 12 to 18 months from the gambling commission for firms that have not kept problem gamblers safe from harm, so do not think that is really a safe argument to make. i think the guardian first exposed it, but within hours the gambling commission onto this and they made it clear that they feel this is certainly ignoring the
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intention of the new regulations and of course, we're still yet to see whether william hill, who are going to introduce a new game shortly, i think with a similar format, whether they actually come across in introduce it. do you think we will see more of this then?” introduce it. do you think we will see more of this then? i think there will be because if we look back at history, we had exactly the same pattern in the 1960s, when every time the government or the courts tried to regulate gambling about period, the industry rapidly develop something new and of course, i think they are going to do same again but this time they have stopped pretty quickly. well, let's hope the gambling commission keep on top of them. thank you very much for time this morning, just to that we did get statements from the bookmakers. paddy power said we are going to assess the customer response and feedback we have received. bet fred said they had to their game at 10:30am yesterday morning after discussions with the gambling
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commission. that is it for me for now. thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. extra police officers have been brought in to tackle a rise in violent crime in harlow in essex. there are concerns that children and other vulnerable people are being housed among drug dealers. they‘ re among several thousand people who've been placed in temporary housing. there are particular concerns around one converted office block, called terminus house. we are creating real issues here if we're putting vulnerable people with young children in accommodation directly adjacent to people that are involved in drugs and drug supply. my view is, and has been from the outset, that i think these companies need to look at the vetting of the people they're putting in and they need to take some responsibility around the placements of certain individuals. well, caridon property, who run the office block, told us it would take action against anyone dealing drugs or causing a nuisance.
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a teenager's been charged with the murder of a driver who was stabbed to death in his car, near clapham common tube station. gavin garraway, who was 40, was attacked last friday. 18—year—old zion chiata is due to appear before magistrates later. a 14—year—old boy and 19—year—old man, who were arrested on suspicion of murder, have been released, under investigation. there is a warning that london's booming restaurant industry is under threat because of a lack of trained chefs. the think tank says that working conditions and pay need to be reformed as 20,000 chefs are leaving the profession every year. let's take a look now at the travel. it's all looking good so far on the tube. no problems reported on any of those lines there. let's take a look at the m25. it's busy clockwise. it's the usual rush—hour delays, but not helped by a vehicle that has broken down earlier.
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some roadworks to tell you about. time for the weather now. here's kate kinsella. good morning. it's a cold start out this morning, one or two spots around zero, if not below. so you mightjust get a bit of frost first thing, it is going to say cold today, with the chance of one or two showers as well. this morning, showers out towards the east, you might get a rumble of thunder and hail in the heavier ones. elsewhere, some sunny spells but it is going to feel quite cold today, temperatures not even making double figures, around eight or nine celsius. overnight tonight, that shower risk still around, over higher ground they could fall wintry, you might get a bit of sleet and hail mixed in there. under the clear skies, temperatures again dropping down
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to zero, maybe below, so you might see a bit of frost tomorrow morning. a chilly start thursday, some sunny spells, still some showers and temperatures again on the cold side. they do make a bit of a recovery as we head towards friday, more dry weather around as we head through the weekend. some sunny spells and temperatures back up at about 14 or 15 celsius. we'll be back in around half—an—hour, our website has plenty more news, travel and weather. bye for now. good morning — welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: rolling back her red lines — theresa may appeals tojeremy corbyn to break the brexit deadlock. pushing for a breakthrough i am taking action to break the logjam. i'm offering to sit down with the leader of the opposition and to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to ensure that we leave the
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european union and that we do so with a deal. but as conservative brexiteers cry betrayal can she keep her party together? the honeybees that could hold the a nswer to the honeybees that could hold the answer to one of the biggest threats to our health. feeding the fad — i'll be speaking to the boss of meat substitute maker quorn just before 8:00. fulham have been relegated back to the championship despite spending it is 100 days to the start of the net for world cup in liverpool. we are going to be talking to some of the goals of the most excited about that event last night, there were commiserations for fulham. they were relegated from the camille league after being beaten despite spending £100 million on players. we've got a band of rain and/or snow moving across scotland, northern england and later into northern ireland. some of that could be heavy and it's windy and cold. for the rest of england and wales, some sunny spells but also heavy showers with thunder and hail.
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it's wednesday, april the 3rd. our top story. the prime minister is likely to meet the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, today to try to agree a joint plan to end the brexit deadlock. after more than seven hours of fractious talks with her cabinet, theresa may said she would be asking the eu for a further short extension beyond the 12th of april, in an attempt to secure britain's exit with a deal. conservative brexiteers have reacted angrily to mr corbyn's involvement — as our political correspondent, chris mason, reports. in a tribal place like westminster, asking the opposition to help is far from normal, and a transparent acknowledgement of weakness, but the prime minister has concluded she has run out of better ideas in her determination to deliver brexit. i am taking action to break the logjam. i'm offering to sit down with the leader of the opposition and to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to ensure
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that we leave the european union and that we do so with a deal. i'm very happy to meet her. we need to have a discussion with the prime minister. we need to ensure that parliament has an opportunity to vote on proposals that prevent us crashing out of the eu at the end of next week. some conservatives think the prime minister's strategy is bizarre, reaching out to someone injeremy corbyn, who the tories have been attempting to portray as not fit to govern. but this is also a big moment for the labour leader. his manifesto committed him to delivering brexit, and now he has that chance, but there will also be the political temptation to leave the prime minister precisely where she is, running out of options and running out of time. chris mason, bbc news. we'll get the latest from adam fleming in brussels in just a moment, but first let's get more details on the prime minister's plan from our political correspondent
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nick eardley. next, to even know when this meeting is first meeting might take place. they wanted to take less as soon as possible, because there is a real impetus to get this moving as quickly as possible. things here keep changing, the story developing so quickly, so let's talk through what the prime minister wants to happen. this is about the future relationship, not about the withdrawal agreement. the prime minister seems to accept that is done. she wants to talk tojeremy corbyn about a political declaration on ourfuture corbyn about a political declaration on our future relationship with europe and what it should look like. there is some scepticism they should be able to get deal. the idea is put a variety of options to parliament. crucially this time, the government has said it will abide by any decision that parliament makes. they
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all want to get this done by the 22nd of may to try to avoid taking pa rt 22nd of may to try to avoid taking part in the european elections. there is a lot of anger in the conservative party about this. some brexit supporters are furious about this. i suspect there will be a lot of pressure on the pm from her own party as well. stop brexit! perfectly timed. adam fleming is in brussels. the eu set out strict guidelines and conditions for any further delays. do you think these changes and the collaboration with potentiallyjeremy corbyn in the labour party, will those changes, will they be enough to get an extra delay question mark what the eu has been saying about an extension is that if theresa may wants to get along extension to the brexit
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process , along extension to the brexit process, another one, to the one we've already had, she would have to louder convincing plan for away forward by next wednesday. she has got a plan for away forward but the question is, whether eu leaders are convinced by it. we had a tweet from donald tusk, the chair of the european council, who chaired —— was chairing the meeting next wednesday, saying it is too soon to tell what will happen. there is no clarity he says but he urged the other 27 eu leaders to be patient so wait and see what she comes up with. then a whole lot of other dates to bear in mind. the summit next wednesday where leaders will make a decision about an extension. if there is no extension, the uk would be leaving the eu with no deal on the 12th of april and as nick was saying, the other big day that everyone has got in mind is the 23rd of may because that's when the elections to the european parliament take place.
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quite ethicalfor the european parliament take place. quite ethical for the uk to stay in the eu beyond that date if they don't have those elections.” the eu beyond that date if they don't have those elections. i feel like i should have a bbc breakfast diary. yes, we do definitely need one of those. prisons in england and wales are in crisis according to a court by mps. the cross—party justice select committee has found the number of prison places has not kept pace with demand, and says the government must reduce the number of criminals put behind bars. the government said it wants to deliver 10,000 more prison places. we're not doing what part of the purpose of prison is, notjust to keep the public safe — that's critical — and just — that's critical too — but also to reform and rehabilitate and we are failing on all of those
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measures and that's basically because we don't have a strategy for managing the size of our prison population and we have got more people in the institutions than we can realistically and constructively deal with. the parents of a woman who killed herself mental health hospital save failings in her care were unbelievable. claire greaves from pontypool was a patient at cygnet hospital in coventry. in february an inquest found a series of care failings contributed to her death. cygnet healthcare says it's making a number of changes following recommendations made at the inquest. the ministry of defence has been criticised for its failure to dispose of 20 obsolete nuclear submarines. nine of the vessels still contain nuclearfuel, according to the government spending watchdog, the national audit office. it said failing to get rid of them risked the uk's reputation as a responsible nuclear power. the mod said it would dispose of them "as soon as practically possible". the duke and duchess of sussex have launched their own instagram account. @sussexroyal is the official account
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for harry and meghan, and it will be used for "important announcements" and to share pictures of their work. it already has nearly two million followers, and the first post included images of the royal couple watching a sailing competition at the invictus games, meghan embracing women at a charity event for those affected by the grenfell tower fire, and meeting fans in australia. it's a strong starter instagram life, 200,001 hour. —— it's a strong starter instagram life, 200,001 hour. -- 200,000 people in one hour. after months of parliamentary deadlock and an ever—closer deadline, there has finally been an offer of compromise from the prime minster. theresa may says she's willing to meet the labour leaderjeremy corbyn to try to find a way out of the brexit impasse. it could mean an end to some of herfamous red lines, something that has angered many in her own party. let's speak now to brexit minister, robin walker, who is in our westminster studio. thank you very much forjoining us. in your opinion, is this the right thing to do, to be negotiating with
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jeremy corbyn? it's the right to be making sure we deliver on the referendum result and leave with a deal. jeremy corbyn can engage with sensible talks, given he was also elected on the manifesto to deliver. i think it's definitely worth pursuing. how many cabinet agreed with this decision? i wasn't in the meeting. there are strong views on both sides. with a deal that secures a long—term interest is the best. the government should be taking any steps that can to deliver on that and today's talks are one way to try and today's talks are one way to try and break what we've seen in parliament, which is whether it's been on government motions, opposition motions or back bench motions. the house of commons is not yet voted for anything apart from trying to rule out no deal. we need
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to make sure that you actually vote for the only withdrawal agreement that has been negotiated, the agreement the prime minister has secured from the european union, and agree on a way forward. that will need cross—party support. agree on a way forward. that will need cross-party support. does this mean the prime minister is in effect given up on the conservative party being able to get this through?” don't think that's the case at all. the vast majority of the conservative party have supported her. certainly at the last boat. the reality is, we don't have a clear majority in parliament. the du p have been clear that they are not going to back this withdrawal agreement so in order to secure the withdrawal agreement, she needs cross— party withdrawal agreement, she needs cross—party support and it is our duty to the country to make sure we secure the withdrawal agreement that gets us out of the eu and allows us to deliver on the referendum result in secures the implementation period, the period of stability.
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labour you will be familiar with have six points. does it deliver the exact same benefits as we currently have as members of the single market and customs union? i think that line, the exact same benefit, is taken from away a mark from a colleague of mine. you're not going to have the exact same benefits. we are leaving the eu. you're going to be outside the european union. how do the prime minister and jeremy corbyn square that, for example? either on a shared plan or how we deliver on what both parties promised at the general election which was deliver on the referendum result, the outside the free movement system. either they can agree on a plan or if not, they can set forward poses the parliament can
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vote on. the difference is, what we saw previously was an attempt by back benches to take control of the houses of parliament, something we we re houses of parliament, something we were sceptical. what we are now seeing is parliament can take decisions on the future relationship to allow us to move forward. crucially, all of this needs to be done quickly. if there are another series of indicative boats, that they happen in the next week. they can go to the european council with a clear offer to say this is what we will do. i will come back to the timetable injust will do. i will come back to the timetable in just a second. will do. i will come back to the timetable injust a second. if will do. i will come back to the timetable in just a second. if you read any of the newspapers, there is deep concern from some parts of the party, some calling it betrayal — what —— betrayal, handing the keys of exit to jeremy what —— betrayal, handing the keys of exit tojeremy corbyn. can the conservative party survive this? stick together? of course. what we
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need to do is stick to what we promised the country would do, delivering a good dealfor the country and if we need to work with other parties in the national interest in order to achieve that, thatis interest in order to achieve that, that is the right thing to do stop you talked about timetable. we missed one deadline already. what would you say to some people who say, this is too little, too late? what i'd say is that there have been engagements across the house of commons over period of time. we have thrashed out many issues. boating repeatedly on some matters. if we secure that, it takes us out of the eu. we are independent sovereign country. we should secure that. we also need to chart a way forward. the house of commons can support and
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vote for it. in that respect, these cross— party vote for it. in that respect, these cross—party talks will be important in showing whether there is a way forward which the two main parties can agree on live there is not, on getting a process in place that parliament can approve. thanks for your time on breakfast. we will see what the labour position is. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. we have got hail and snow on the forecast. if you are waking up in parts of scotland and northern england and wales, don't be surprised if you see some snow. it is fairly transitory and will push when next few hours. it's rather chilly outside. to are pretty low.
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if you have a look at the rain and snow radar which is shot past. you can see how we've got a lot of cold air across our shores. that's where we have showers. there is five centimetres of rain across parts of walcott, for example, in cumbria. all that is moving west through the day, preceded by some rain. it will be rain by the time it gets into northern ireland but we also have some snow across parts of wales, so bear that in some snow across parts of wales, so bearthat in mind some snow across parts of wales, so bear that in mind if you arejust stepping out. the other thing is we could see heavy showers develop through the course of the day as well, breezy in the south, windy in the north and there is a cold northerly, so although the temperature say 79, it will feel much colder than those temperatures are suggesting. in fact, this is how i feel. —— seven to
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are suggesting. in fact, this is how ifeel. —— seven to nine. in fact are suggesting. in fact, this is how i feel. —— seven to nine. in fact in the showers, you are likely to hear some thunder and see some hale. at times and heavier showers, there could be a little bit obsolete in them as well. as we head into the evening and overnight, low pressure is very much still with us, the centre of it sinking down across ireland and wales but with low pressure, everything rotates aboundedin pressure, everything rotates abounded in anticlockwise direction, which is why we are seeing these bands of showers and also rain in the north. it is going to be cold enough some frost under clear skies, some patchy mist and fog, we have low temperatures, there is the risk of some ice on untreated surfaces. on thursday, the low pressure sings a little bit further south and the other thing is we still have a weather front across the north of the country, is that still is going to be producing some rain but it too is wrapped around the low pressure, you can see the circulation, the rain coming in across scotland with some hill snow, some snow too across northern england. we have all the
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showers in the north—west, with some of those wintry across northern wales as well. dry and sunny and central parts of the uk, temperatures higher there than today but across the board, the temperatures are lower than they should be at this stage in april. thank you. what child did we miss out on there? it was a snow flow chart, was it? —— chart. out on there? it was a snow flow chart, was it? -- chart. it wasjust on the wrong position. well, you dealt with it perfectly. thank you. if you are getting a flybe flight this morning, you might want to check it's not cancelled before you set off for the airport. there have been a number of cancellations this morning. steph's got more on this. yeah, so what we have gathered this morning as we reckoned about 24
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flybe flights have been cancelled, mainly in and out of belfast airport but it also affects east midlands, glasgow, birmingham, leeds, bradford, aberdeen, edinburgh, southampton, glasgow, amsterdam and bordeaux. we know that they put out a statement last night saying that they are going to be some cancellations and belfast, and those passengers have received an e—mail or text saying what they should do next, either sorting out another flight next, either sorting out another flight or getting a full refund, but we do not know why. so we have been on the phone 21 this morning and they can't at the moment tell us why these flights have been cancelled. obviously, this is a big company, 8 million passengers use flybe every year, they travel to destinations across the uk anti—europe as well, i know that also early in the week, there was a bit of embarrassment for them because they launched a new flight them because they launched a new flight from newquay to heathrow and
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then one of the flights had to be cancelled. so all of the passengers, you still want to get to heathrow, had to get the bus, took six hours, soa had to get the bus, took six hours, so a bit ofa pr had to get the bus, took six hours, so a bit of a pr disaster for them on monday as well. —— 21. so as i say, i know the story but i do not know at the minute why, operational reasons was the reason given last night they are probably seeing this right now alike tell steph what happened. hopefully they will tell you within the next couple of minutes and you can tell them. any customer affected by this, you should be able to get a full refund definitely, some information for them about what to do next as well. 0k, them about what to do next as well. ok, thank you. antimicrobial resistance has been called the 21st century‘s biggest single threat to human health. it stops drugs, like antibiotics, from working properly. many believe antibiotics have been overprescribed, and are becoming less effective at killing bacteria. but a team at the univeristy of birmingham believe there could be
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hope, in the form of honey, as tim muffett reports. i was gravely ill, gravely ill. when debbie contracted a urinary tract infection, she assumed antibiotics would take care of it, but things went downhill fast. i developed sepsis, where your body sort of goes into overdrive and it attacks itself. they started pumping antibiotics into me, and then as each day passed, they found that that antibiotic wasn't working. anti—microbial resistance is what happens when microorganisms such as these evolve and antibiotics can no longer kill them. anti—microbial resistance is predicted to kill more people than cancer by 2050, and if we get to the stage where we have no working antibiotics, it would essentially mean the end of modern medicine. research aims to clear up the question of why can bacteria not survive in a beehive?
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and one of the main reasons for that is the natural antimicrobial properties of honey. honey has been used as a treatment for infection for centuries, it contains natural antibiotics, which can kill bacteria. the problem is, it's sticky, which means it's very difficult to use in surgery or on a wound. we're taking it from something that's thick and sticky and turning it into sprays, creams and powders, that can be easily applied to lots of different parts of the body. honey based medical gel has already been developed. the team here want to take that idea further. it's hoped that if funding is found, these products will be brought to medical trial in the next few years. tim muffett, bbc news. it sounds absolutely amazing. let's talk more about this now with peter gibson from antibiotic research uk. good morning. good morning. you
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really think this could be the a nswer to really think this could be the answer to lots of issues? well, i think potentially exciting but it seems every couple of days, we hear of another unique alternative that is going to help us with antibiotic resistance, platypus milk was one of the things that have been mentioned, antibiotic properties in soils another one that has been mentioned. the issue here is not the wonderful, innovative thinking of people we have just seen, is more the development of the drug, it is getting it from the laboratory into the pharmacy and treating patients. remind us why it is so important that we find an alternative to antibiotics. well, far cleverer people than me as saying that this could be the biggest health problem facing humankind. antibiotics were miracle medication to the 20th century, they really were. the issue, of course, those that they are not working as well as they did previously. do not want to return to an age where we could be killed by an age where we could be killed by an infected clutch and we're also hearing from hospitals that they are now worried about routine operations because they fear more about people
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getting mrsa, things like that, superbugs, because antibiotics simply are not working the way they used to. we talked about that quite a lot here on this programme. do you think there is beginning to be a change? one of the issue seems to be overprescribing or people perhaps taking antibiotics with things that maybe they do not need them, is that changing? i think that it is but i'm still hearing from gps a lot of the time that people are demanding antibiotics. i think it is a symptom of the way that we live life now, nobody wants to be a lot off work, will want to be better quicker and people believe that antibiotics of the silver bullet that is going to make them well again just the silver bullet that is going to make them well againjust like that and is not the case, but the messages getting a little bit when i hear a messages getting a little bit when i heara gp tell messages getting a little bit when i hear a gp tell me that for example, they have been threatened with violence not handing out antibiotics, we've got a problem. it might seem quite a remote issue to people, a bit like environmentalism is to some people, but if you want to do is to some people, but if you want todoa is to some people, but if you want to do a little bit, back a charity
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like ours as we try and find some research, but also make sure you are a vigilant visitor, when you go to hospital, keep your hands clean, all that kind of thing but also stopped demanding antibiotics and doctors. it really, if you start taking antibiotics were cold, you could be doing your health some bad in the long run and when you really need antibiotics, and they do not work, then you are in trouble. that is really interesting, peter. thank you very much. much to think about this morning and honey could be one of the answers potentially. yeah. we're counting down to the netball world cup, with an extravaganza outside our studios here in salford quays. sally is there. good morning. can you see her? sally, no. maybe she is limping up. we will see her soon. sally is going to be chatting to some of those, i think we have 100 players out there
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as well. and the internet or coach is out there with them as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. extra police officers have been brought in to tackle a rise in crime in harlow in essex, following concerns that children and other vulnerable people are being housed among drug dealers. they‘ re among several thousand people who have been placed in temporary housing. there are particular concerns around one converted office block, called terminus house. we are creating real issues here if we're putting vulnerable people with young children in accommodation directly adjacent to people that are involved in drugs and drug supply. my view is, and has been from the outset, that i think these companies need to look at the vetting of the people they're putting in and they need to take some responsibility around the placements of certain individuals. well, caridon property, who run the office block, told us it would take action against anyone dealing drugs or causing a nuisance.
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a teenager's been charged with the murder of a driver who was stabbed to death in his car, near clapham common tube station. gavin garraway, who was 40, was attacked last friday. 18—year—old zion chiata is due to appear before magistrates later. a 14—year—old boy and a 19—year— old man, who were arrested on suspicion of murder, have been released under investigation. it has cost £1 billion and arrived more than six months late but tonight, tottenham's new stadiums officially opened with a premier league game against crystal palace. it holds more than 62,000 fans, making it the biggest club stadium in london. let's take a look now at the travel. it's all looking good so far on the tube. let's take a look at the m25. it's busy clockwise.
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it's the usual rush—hour delays, but not helped by a vehicle that's broken down earlier. some roadworks to tell you about. time for the weather now. here's kate kinsella. good morning. it's a cold start out there this morning, one or two spots around zero, if not below. so you mightjust get a bit of frost first thing, it is going to stay cold today, with the chance of one or two heavy showers as well. now, this morning, the showers out towards the east, you might get a rumble of thunder, you might get a bit of hail in the heavier ones. elsewhere, some sunny spells but it is going to feel quite cold today, temperatures not even making double figures, at around eight or nine celsius. overnight tonight, some clear spells but also that shower risk still around, over higher ground they could fall wintry, you might get a bit of sleet and hail mixed in there. under the clear skies though, temperatures again dropping down
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to zero, maybe below, so you mightjust see a little bit of frost tomorrow morning. so a chilly start to thursday, some sunny spells, still some showers and temperatures again on the cold side. they do make a bit of a recovery though as we head through friday, more in the way of dry weather around as we head through the weekend. some sunny spells and temperatures back up at about 14 or 15 celsius. so we'll be back in around half an hour. our website has plenty more news, travel and weather. now, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. my my minister is likely to meetjeremy corbyn to come up with a joint plan to end the brexit deadlock. with a joint plan to end the brexit deadlock. after more than seven hours of fractious talks with her cabinet, theresa may said she would be asking the eu for a further short extension
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beyond the 12th of april in an attempt to secure britain's exit with a deal. conservative brexiteers reacted angrily to mr corbyn's involvement, but brexit minister robin walker told this programme that working with labour was the right thing to do. the party can stick to this plan but we need to promise what we do. if we work with other parties in order to achieve that, that is the right thing to do. prisoners in england and wales are in deep crisis according to a report by mps. the cross— party according to a report by mps. the cross—partyjustice according to a report by mps. the cross—party justice select committee has found the number of resident places has not kept pace with demand and says the government must reduce the number of criminals behind bars. the government said it wants to deliver 10,000 more prison places. the parents of a woman who killed herself at a mental health hospital safe railings in her care were unbelievable. claire greaves from pontypool was a patient at cygnet hospital in
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coventry. in february an inquest found a series of care failings contributed to her death. cygnet healthcare says it's making a number of changes following recommendations made at the inquest. hundreds of thousands of people who were mis—sold payday loans will receive a fraction of the compensation they are entitled to after a lender collapsed. wageday advance had given loans to about 800—thousand people but went into administration earlier this year. -- 800,000. customers who paid off loans but were due compensation will now only get a fraction of the full amount. a suspect in the murder of los angeles rapper nipsey hussle has been arrested, according to police. eric holder had been on the run since the weekend after fleeing the scene of the fatal shooting. hussle was killed outside his clothing store on saturday following a ‘verbal altercation' with the suspect. the artist was nominated for best rap album at this year's grammy awards. those are the main stories around this morning. more than 100,000
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women were inspired to dust off their trainers and get back onto the net all court following england's gold winning success of the commonwealth games last year. sally is just commonwealth games last year. sally isjust outside our commonwealth games last year. sally is just outside our studios in salford this morning. with100 netball players as well. good morning. i'm waving at that big camera. we have 100 girls here. talking to the people at home. we have 100 girls here. as you can tell, all having an absolutely brilliant time. all excited about the start. it's in 100 days, as you said. much more than that, including some inside scoop from tracey neville. we will start with news from last night. money can't buy happiness but it hasn't bought for
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them a place in the premier league. any excuse for a party but this was one fulham spent more than £100 million trying to avoid. their relegation, proof that money can't buy premier league safety. the ending was spectacular. they managed to go into half—time 1—1 before watford's will hughes power—drilled the first nail in their coffin. the rest was the story of their season, fulham's threadbare defence developed the usual holes. troy deeney scored third. not too long later, kiko femenia made it four and slammed the door. that, the 76th league goal fulham have conceded this season. we all realised when you get relegated from this division, there is some serious problems, or serious issues what have gone on. i'm sure with the right time in the right moment, we will all sit down and obviously work out where the mistakes are made. the plan was so different. fulham spent more money last summer than any promoted side but having raided the sales, they found out not
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much really fitted them. their unsettled side were bottom of the table when slavisa jokanovi was sacked as manager. they brought in claudio ranieri, famous for winning the league with leicester, but such magic is hard to repeat. and byt he time scott parker took the temporary job, it was an impossible one. the problems, it seems, run deeper. we have not shown a togetherness, unity, a desire, passion. everything that the manager stands for, we've not shown. money will not be the answer this summer and a club so used to spending must work out what it can save. patrick geary, bbc news. it's been a very different season for another promoted side, wolves. they beat manchester united two—one thanks to this bizarre own goal from chris smalling. united had ashley young sent off earlier and stay outside the top four.
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the second biggest club ground in the uk will host its first competitive match later. tottenham hotspur‘s new stadium is opening six months later than planned but will hold 62 thousand people. and for most of yesterday's formula one testing session they were all chasing a schumacher in a ferrari. michael's son mick was driving for his dad's old team. he ended up second fastest. netball fever has well and truly swept the uk following the success of the england sqaud at last year's commonwealth games, and with just 100 days to go until the world cup in liverpool, we've brought the game here to the home of bbc breakfast. we'll see this lot in action in just a moment, but firstjayne mccubbin has been to see what all the fuss is about. take me back to high school. what
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we re take me back to high school. what were you? defence. a ged. gd. it's so many years ago. centre. goal attack. what did you play? i don't... attack. what did you play? i don't. .. the thing is, most girls did. an estimated eight in ten of us wa nt did. an estimated eight in ten of us want pulled on a bid and now women are coming back to the game. i stopped when i was about 13 and started to get 31. 15 years later, i picked it back up again. i'm 54 and ijust came picked it back up again. i'm 54 and i just came back picked it back up again. i'm 54 and ijust came back in. the resurgence is real and there is one big driver. was there a gold—medal effect? absolutely. when england took the gold and everyone in the nation went
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wild, i think we had a 2000% increase in traffic. in fact, an estimated 130,000 women have gone back to all the commonwealth games. i sent you before, why do you love it? i'm really good at shooting. i've not got one in tonight. well, we've just been learning how to sidestep with becky and hope. what am i doing? sidestep. matt, sally. still got the skills. not really. you play netball at school? why do you enjoy it so much? it's just great fun stop i feel good after a match. it's good.” just great fun stop i feel good after a match. it's good. i like as after a match. it's good. i like as a team with other people. everyone
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else is there. what about seeing all the big superstars? are you inspired by them? yes. that's go and talk to some. are you ready for this? watch my sidestep. tracey neville. sorry. that was really bad. we have england tea m that was really bad. we have england team had coach, ryan, the northern ireland manager and claire maxwell, the scotland captain. we're going to talk about the world cup in a second but why are so many women and girls coming back to all? it's a really empowering sport. predominately females played in our country. the resurgence from the commonwealth games, we've got 130,000 people back into the sport as well. it encourages more participation. it's a great indoor sport as well. it can be played in any arena. you set up a
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court here. dan ryan, how are your preparations going? we are seeing each other twice a month and have been doing so since december, it's an exciting group to work with. i detect that you are not from northern ireland. about australia but really proud to be leading northern ireland. claire, lovely to see you. your scotland captain. tell us about your preparations. at the moment, we are currently using the english super league so working alongside a national coach, the head coach as well. we're really proud what we're doing. tracy, let's talk properly about wind. the expectations for you are incredibly high. how do you manage the pressure at this point? we know that winning
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after winning is always going to be tough, especially on home soil but one of the things we did well was after the commonwealth games, not change our programme, keep maintaining it. we planted for the 4- maintaining it. we planted for the 4— year cycle, and maintained our processes and protocols. although there's been a lot of external interest without sport, we've been trying to everyone grounded and now isa trying to everyone grounded and now is a really good time for us. the girls are back in a spread out all over the world. the focus for us is a bit of the world cup because we have super league clubs and championships to win in their own environment for it so from my point of view, that is a really good change of scenery for them.” remember chatting to you in december. drunk. not me! some of us remember it. what an incredible mark that was for you. and the girls
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almost seem to be, they were so bowled over by the recognition. from our point of view, we did not have a chance to celebrate that run and although it was six months later, we we re although it was six months later, we were waiting 20 years for that so for them girls to go out there and celebrate, the recognition from the vote, the audience and from external public, the greatest moment of the year was probably one of the greatest achievements. again some outstanding teams and competitors that we were up against so from our point of view, to win the awards on the national stage is immense. we just want to continue that momentum. they are, because you other player, i want to ask you one question. what's it going to be like to have loads of home support? itjust sold out so quickly. we are really excited to come down. in terms of getting home support, we are really excited and glad it is here in
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liverpool. we are going to be here all morning. apparently i'm going to play a bit. we will have a look. tracy knows. i love how you cleared up tracy knows. i love how you cleared up neatly who was drinking at the sports personality of the year awards. totally. we know the truth. enjoy. it looks really fun out there. there it is in all its glory. some people say it looks like a giant roll on deodorant. australia wanted back in 2000 for dean. this event, taking place in 100 days. 100 days to go. should we catch up with the weather. carole, what's going on? we got everything going on. you know what we say in
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this country, don't like the weather, wait 15 minutes. today we have a little bit of everything. it's a cold start wherever you are so bear that in mind. we have got some snow, snow falling across parts of scotla nd some snow, snow falling across parts of scotland and northern england at the moment. it's going to be moving westwards through the course of the day and for the rest of the uk, some heavy showers with hail and thunder. the mail there has been pushed away by all this cold air coming through the arctic. you can see the sparkly cloud here, the odd shower through the north. a thicker area of cloud producing the rain and the snow. currently we got about six centimetres in carrbridge. eight —— six centimetres in cumbria. through the morning, that is all going to be drifting westwards. it's a company in the north and the west by cold northerly wind. we also got snow this morning on some of the higher parts of wales but away from that,
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there are a lot of showers to develop through this morning. heavy with hail and thunder. temperature—wise, 7— nine but that is where it will stay on your thermometer. when you add all the strength of the wind, this is how it will feel against your skin. two, three, maybe four as we pushed down towards plymouth. a cold day in prospect. especially in the north and west. as we head on through the evening at overnight, the low pressure bringing us all this weather sinks southwards. everything rotates around low usher in an anticlockwise direction so we are seeing this swell of cloud. we have clear spells, submits an fault touches forming. particularly across eastern england. cold enough for frost. we may well see some ice on untreated surfaces to look out for. tomorrow, the low pressure sinks a bit further south. we still have
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this weather front wrapped around it. we're to see the rain. the rain predominantly with hill snow across scotla nd predominantly with hill snow across scotland but you can see it coming in across the north—east of england through the day as well. hill snow temporarily for you. is it because around the centre of the low pressure further south. a fair few showers. some of those wintry with height as well. or central and eastern areas, we are looking at a dry day with sunny spells developing. temperature is still below average for this stage of april. as we had to file into the weekend, generally it's not going to be as cold and it will be largely dry with some sunshine because what happens is, the low pressure sinks down towards the bay of biscay which you can see here and everything again moving around as we start to drag this milder airfrom the near continent. but we still do have low pressure close by. rain for a time. shari outbreaks of rain. moving away
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from that, dry conditions and temperatures up 14 degrees in london and into the weekend, high pressure sta rts and into the weekend, high pressure starts to take control of our weather. the north sea coast, we will be prone to some low cloud. temperature is a little bit lower. bye for now. temperature is a little bit lower. thank you. we will see you a little bit later on. let's go back to our main story and prime minister's appealed to jeremy main story and prime minister's appealed tojeremy corbyn to work together to find a way out of the brexit deadlock. let's speak now to political journalists from those papers, tom newton dunn from the sun and nicola bartlett from the mirror. morning to both of you. i would love very much for both of you to take us through those cabinet discussions, seven hours, no phones, how fractious was it from your sources? tom, we'll start with you on that one. it sounded like a pretty impressive rollercoaster that they
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are widely differing reports of what happened in the room yesterday, depending on who you talk to. there was an enormous spinning operation under way, let me just tell you, was an enormous spinning operation under way, let mejust tell you, we had this extraordinary moment when they finally came to their agreement about five p. m.. they finally came to their agreement about five p.m.. minister they finally came to their agreement about five p. m.. minister wanted they finally came to their agreement about five p.m.. minister wanted to be the first to tell the nation she has done this quite stunning deal jeremy corbyn, so she locked the entirety of the cabinet in the cabinet room for an hour while she was writing his statement, refused to give them their phones back and plied them with cheap chilean red wine so that they did not spill the beans before she could, and this is really the state of the british government in 2019. depending on who you do or do not believe, it would appear that they were really four hard—core refuseniks, did not want to do this at all. it must be noted that none of those four have yet
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resigned, so they protested perhaps a little bit too much this morning. so cheap chilli and red wine, is that perhaps likely to work on jeremy corbyn? are they likely to find some common ground, do you think? well, yes, jeremy corbyn is not known for his lover one by any means, is that tactic itself might not work but it is a really situation. —— for his love of wine. he has been given a really unique opportunity for the leader of the opposition to kinda decide the course of the country but obviously, this is out, well, i think we are past the 11th hour now, where theresa may has summarily failed to get a deal through and she is basically now said well, it is over to you and if he is seen to obstruct this process in any way, than the tories can quite clearly say we were trying to deliver brexit and labour we re trying to deliver brexit and labour were the ones stopped it. it is fascinating though, tom, where we go
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from here because it seems that she is almost, the prime minister is almost given up on her own party, i can't get in? by using my own mps, i'm going to see if i can do something with the labour party. —— i can't get it through by using my own mps. do you think she is going to get this compromise through because there were some really quite strong comments on some of those eog members yesterday.” strong comments on some of those eog members yesterday. i think it was a difficult decision for her to make, was she going to try to scrape together one or two votes to command a majority, get this thing over the line, then she has to take an entire act of parliament to that place behind us with this tiny little coalition of begging and scraping eog members, the dup, or does she pivot to no deal whatsoever? or does she do what is really the only way to be sure of getting a bill the parliaments, and that is with cross— party parliaments, and that is with cross—party support. —— erg. i had
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a lwa ys cross—party support. —— erg. i had always suspected that this moment would come to theresa may. she has been almost three years trying unbelievably hard to take entire party with her on brexit, which is split down the middle about what to do about it, soft, hard, none whatsoever, take your pick. she failed at the last hurdle and she is finally falling on the side of the fence at a few of us probably suspected she always would do, which isa suspected she always would do, which is a softer brexiter protect the economy, rather than a harder one to protect the ideology.” economy, rather than a harder one to protect the ideology. i suppose, how much will she be willing to move on those redlines, which obviously they're not going to be able to all be there this point forward? how much do you think there will be wiggle room from jeremy corbyn on those six points that labour have stated a lot over the last few months? well, tom says that the tory party is divided, obviously the tory party is divided, obviously the tory party is divided, obviously the tory party is equally divided and has beena party is equally divided and has been a difficult few months of the party. but obviously the labour party. we get to this point and you think yes, it was perhaps inevitable
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that it would come but the logical thing surely would have been to do this months ago, you know, a few people i think ability said this but ata time people i think ability said this but at a time when she did not get a majority, that was the time to come back to the country and say look, do not have the numbers to do what i have said i wanted to do and to each other that point. now, have said i wanted to do and to each otherthat point. now, it have said i wanted to do and to each other that point. now, it looks desperate. essentially is because she put her redlines quite early on and they have chapter early on in the corner, she has again and again spoken out about the customs union and any kind of referendum, which i think probably she would prefer general election before it got to that stage, equally jeremy general election before it got to that stage, equallyjeremy corbyn's policy has kind of hardened behind a customs union and a confirm entry... and that is because of the huge support for remain, not only in the parliamentary labour party but also amongst the membership, so can she,
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has she left herself enough wiggle room now to allow him to make enough gains at this point? i mean, we're talking about a very kind of political situation and it is to leaders who are really not very good at politics, as it were. so how they go ahead in this negotiation is going to really difficult, i think. they are in charge though, as we both know. i think, they are in charge though, as we both know. ithink, nicola they are in charge though, as we both know. i think, nicola there, tom, has gone through some of the potential options. i wonder, tom, has gone through some of the potential options. iwonder, of tom, has gone through some of the potential options. i wonder, of what could happen from this point forward , could happen from this point forward, what you think is the most likely? are we looking at a no deal, general election, some sort of compromise, a customs union coming back into this, how do you think that the wind is blowing at the moment? in the heart of hearts, suspect that this deal with jeremy corbyn will not work because i think that the politics are just too toxic actually for both of them. they will need to give it a good go, they really only have until the weekend to get a deal done, which is
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breakneck speed think of all the stuff they have got to talk to. they need to present this to the european council to get this extension, which really gives them a few days to get this extension out. —— talk through. i suspect it will fall because both of them will think of principled objections, perhaps jeremy of them will think of principled objections, perhaszeremy corbyn's red line might be a confirmatory public vote or a people ‘s vote, as some are calling it, perhaps theresa may's might be the same but if all this does fail, we still have theresa may's fallback, which is issued out in the house of commons probably monday next week, where the commons will decide the final outcome and that will almost certainly be in my view some sort of soft brexiter, almost certainly in the shape of a customs union. really interesting to hear assessment of what happened in the past 24 hours, thank you for that insight. —— soft
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brexit. cheap chilli and wine.” thought it was cheap to lay in mind. which one was it, tom? i think they are almost interchangeable, whichever takes your fancy. -- chilean wine. another fast food giant has gone after a slice of the growing vegan market. steph's got more on this. yes, this is really interesting. a lot of people are interested in vegan food, so now the fast food chains are trying to work out how they can be part of it. vegetarian food has been available in fast food chains for some time, but the customers they now also want to entice are those looking for vegan food. greggs brought out the vegan sausage roll, kfc have hinted they might offer vegan food, and also, burger king have brought out a vegan whopper burger. we're going to talk now to the boss of quorn foods, whojoins us we're going to talk now to the boss of quorn foods, who joins us from our middlesbrough studio. thank you very much forjoining us, kevin. you helped greggs to develop the vegan sausage roll, didn't you? how easy is it to create vegan food that is i
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guess similar to popular classics? yeah, that is a great way of putting it because actually is not difficult to make vegan food, making really good vegan food is difficult, making it very similar to me classics is extremely difficult. so we're proud of working with greggs and helping them create i think it is a top five product in their stores now and it is really difficult, it was two yea rs of is really difficult, it was two years of development work to get such a good product. how much is it about them making it taste the same as the meat versions of things or the vegetarian versions? well, in that particular case, there were two... which was obviously get the feeling right because greggs's products are famous for the great tasting filling in them and obviously that was a lot of work, but also greggs do a lot of work to actually get the pastry right because it is really difficult to do a good pastry without using butter and eggs and so on. and so to get
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the vegan pastry was a real breakthrough for them and i think it shows how difficult this is because i understand with the burger king project, which i think is only in the us, the product will be labelled vegetarian because the burger is vegan but some of the other ingredients are not, commerce that shows how difficult it is. yeah, and also without burger, the burger king one, as you say it is being trialled in the us to one of the elements they use, as a marketing point, is that it will be leading like a meat burger, is that something that people who are big and want? —— it will bleed like a meat burger. not necessarily, a lot of these products actually just people necessarily, a lot of these products actuallyjust people cutting down on me but when they do, what we're seeing is a lot of them would actually like the conversion, maybe not just a vegetarian actually like the conversion, maybe notjust a vegetarian version. the most important thing is a product being really like a meat product rather than... the bleeding bit is a sort of nice marketing tool, it is not the most critical factor, it is
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the succulents, flavour and texture that matters most. thank you very much for your time, that matters most. thank you very much foryourtime, lovely that matters most. thank you very much for your time, lovely to speak to you this morning. i spoke to kevin 2014 when it was the horsemeat scandal and they were doing really well off the back of people wanting to look for alternatives to meet there. thank you very much. just to quickly get to the bottom of this again, was tom saying cheap chilli and red wine or cheap chilean red line? no, he was saying red wine from chile. obsessed by food. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. extra police officers have been brought in to tackle a rise in violent crime in harlow in essex, following concerns that children and other vulnerable people are being housed alongside drug dealers. they‘ re among several thousand people who've been placed
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in temporary housing. there are particular concerns around one converted office block, called terminus house. we are creating real issues here if we're putting vulnerable people with young children in accommodation directly adjacent to people that are involved in drugs and drug supply. my view is, and has been from the outset, that i think these companies need to look at the vetting of the people they're putting in and they need to take some responsibility around the placements of certain individuals. caridon property, who run the office block, told us it would take action against anyone dealing drugs or causing a nuisance. a teenager's been charged with the murder of a driver who was stabbed to death in his car, near clapham common tube station. gavin garraway, who was 40, was attacked last friday. 18—year—old zion chiata is due to appear before magistrates later. a 14—year—old boy and 19—year—old man, who were arrested on suspicion of murder, have been released, under investigation.
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the world's largest amphibians has a new home at london sue. a giant chinese salamander has gone on display. he found in a cereal box by the uk border force. smugglers had tried to import him. he has been a big hit with keepers, who have been making excuses to visit him. let's take a look now at the travel. it's all looking good so far on the tube. no problems reported on any of those lines there. let's take a look at the m25. it's busy clockwise. a car broke down there earlier. some roadworks to tell you about. cannon street is closed between london bridge and queen victoria street. time for the weather now, here's kate kinsella. good morning. it's a cold start out there this morning, one or two spots around zero, if not below. so you mightjust get a bit of frost first thing, it is going to stay cold today, with the chance of one or two heavy showers as well. now, this morning, the showers out towards the east, you might get a rumble of thunder,
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you might get a bit of hail in the heavier ones. elsewhere, some sunny spells, but it is going to feel quite cold today, temperatures not even making double figures, at around eight or nine celsius. now, overnight tonight, some clear spells but also that shower risk still around, over higher ground they could fall wintry, you might get a bit of sleet and hail mixed in there. under the clear skies though, temperatures again dropping down to zero, maybe below, so you mightjust see a little bit of frost tomorrow morning. so a chilly start to thursday, some sunny spells, still some showers and temperatures again on the cold side. they do make a bit of a recovery though as we head through friday, more in the way of dry weather around as we head through the weekend. some sunny spells and temperatures back up at about 14 or 15 celsius. so we'll be back in around half an hour. our website has plenty more news, travel and weather. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: rolling back her red lines — theresa may appeals tojeremy corbyn to break the brexit deadlock. i'm offering to sit down with the leader of the opposition and to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to to ensure that we leave the european union, and that we do so with the deal. but as conservative brexiteers cry betrayal, can she keep her party together? honey bees that could hold the a nswer to honey bees that could hold the answer to one of the biggest threats to our health. the airline flybe has cancelled 24 flights this morning at cities across the uk. i will have the details. we are celebrating 100 days to go until the netball world cup in england. thousands of women and girls have been encouraged to ta ke and girls have been encouraged to take up the sport after the
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commonwealth success. we have rain and snow crossing parts of northern england and scotland at the moment bringing rain eventually into northern ireland, coupled with cold northerly winds. for the rest of england and wales, heavy and thundery showers with some hail. i will have the details in 15 minutes. good morning. it's wednesday, april 3rd. our top story. the prime minister is likely to meet the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, later to try to agree a joint plan to end the brexit deadlock. after more than seven hours of fractious talks with her cabinet, theresa may said she would be asking the eu for a further short extension beyond 12th april, in an attempt to secure britain's exit with a deal. conservative brexiteers have reacted angrily to mr corbyn's involvement — as our political correspondent, chris mason reports. in a tribal place like westminster, asking the opposition to help is far from normal, and a transparent acknowledgement of weakness,
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but the prime minister has concluded she has run out of better ideas in her determination to deliver brexit. i am taking action to break the logjam. i'm offering to sit down with the leader of the opposition and to try to agree a plan that we would both stick to to ensure that we leave the european union and that we do so with a deal. i'm very happy to meet her. we need to have a discussion with the prime minister. we need to ensure that parliament has an opportunity to vote on proposals that prevent us crashing out of the eu at the end of next week. some conservatives think the prime minister's strategy is bizarre, reaching out to someone injeremy corbyn, who the tories have been attempting to portray as not fit to govern. but this is also a big moment for the labour leader. his manifesto committed him to delivering brexit, and now he has that chance. but there will also be the political
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temptation to leave the prime minister precisely where she is, running out of options and running out of time. chris mason, bbc news. we'll get the latest from adam fleming in brussels in a moment, but first let's get more details on the prime minister's plan from our political correspondent nick eardley. he's at westminster. we will speak to rebecca long—bailey in a few minutes from the labour side of this. that's crucial to all of this, compromise between theresa may and jeremy corbyn who have not really been talking up until this point. jeremy corbyn who have not really been talking up until this pointm is, and it is going to be fascinating to see whether they can thrash something out over the next 48 is or so. downing street wants to get this done as soon as possible because the clock, we have said it so many times, is ticking. let me tell you briefly what the plan is for the next few days. jeremy corbyn and theresa may will probably meet
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later today to talk about whether they can agree on something that should be put to parliament later this week. if they don't, if there is no agreement, then a variety of options will be put to parliament later in the week. the idea downing street has is if labour agree those votes should be binding on the government. they want to get this all done by the 22nd of may to avoid the uk having to be involved in european elections. i've got to say, on the conservative side there is a lot of anger at the prime minister that she seems to be pivoting towards relying on labour votes to try and get a brexit deal through parliament. and on the labour side there is pressure too. just texting a few labour politicians this morning, they are saying tojeremy corbyn, do not facilitate this, you cannot get on board with a tory brexit. so there is a lot up in the airjust now. nick, thank you.
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there certainly is, not least what other european leaders will make of it all. adam fleming has got reaction from brussels. they must have watched this intrigued, at least. the eu has been saying to theresa may for a couple of months now, you don't have the votes on your side and you will have to reach across to the other side to get them to help you get this deal through. one of the first eu leaders who suggested that in december was the danish prime minister will stop he tweeted last night he welcomed this but he asked, is this too good to be true. nick talks about texts he's had from mps. i'vejust heard true. nick talks about texts he's had from mps. i've just heard from an ambassador who is usually right about the sort of things and he said it is good that there were treaty is still the point of departure and also they are going to explore things across the aisle, so talk to the labour party, but it is too early to respond to the possible request for the extension and we are waiting for london to come forward with a plan. theresa may has sketched out an idea of what she is going to do butjust saying she is
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going to do butjust saying she is going to do butjust saying she is going to talk tojeremy corbyn is not enough for the eu yet. they want to see the end product where this cross— party to see the end product where this cross—party process leads, and then to reason they will have to explain to reason they will have to explain to eu leaders at a special summit on wednesday what she intends to do, what the way forward is, and eu leaders will have to decide, do they grant heran leaders will have to decide, do they grant her an extension, one or a short or do they say no, and the uk will leave with no deal on the 12th of april? so many unanswered questions. thank you. we will speak to rebecca long—bailey from the labour party in a few moments time. the cross—party justice select committee found a number of prison places has not kept pace with demand and says the government must reduce the number of criminals put behind bars. the government said it wants to deliver 10,000 more prison places. the parents of a woman
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who killed herself at a mental health hospital say failings in her care were unbelievable. claire greaves from pontypool was a patient at cygnet hospital in coventry. in february an inquest found a series of care failings contributed to her death. paul martin reports. as a child, they described me as fussy, picky, choosy. but in my mind, i was weak, bad and fat. claire greaves described in vivid detail the reality of life with anorexia and a personality disorder. she was a campaigner, a role that took her to the breakfast sofa where she explained what it was like to be kept in a police cell because a mental health bed was unavailable. i was absolutely terrified at the time. it made the situation a lot worse at a time when i really needed it to be better. but while campaigning for better mental health services for others,
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her own struggle continued. in 2017, she was moved to this new specialist hospital in coventry. despite being assessed as high risk, she was able to kill herself in her hospital room. but an inquestjury did not decide claire's death was suicide. they reached an open conclusion and said that failings here at cygnet contributed to claire's death. among them, claire's observation levels were not increased, despite her making several self—harm attempts in the days before she died, and her care plan wasn't followed, which meant she was alone in her room when she took her own life. it seems unbelievable that that can happen. they've got the systems in place to make sure that they manage the healthcare properly but the failings were quite shocking. cygnet health care says it's making a number of changes cygnet healthcare says it's making a number of changes following recommendations made at the inquest. paul martin, bbc news. viewers in wales can see more on that story at 10:30pm tonight on bbc one wales. the rest of the uk will be able to watch it on the iplayer.
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hundreds of thousands of people who were mis—sold payday loans will receive a fraction of the compensation they are entitled to after a lender collapsed. wageday advance had given loans to about 800,000 people but went into administration earlier this year. customers who paid off loans but were due compensation will now only get a fraction of the full amount. the duke and duchess of sussex have launched their own instagram account. "sussexroyal" is the official account for harry and meghan, and it will be used for important announcements and to share pictures of their work. it already has nearly two million followers, and the first post included images of the royal couple watching a sailing competition at the invictus games, meghan embracing women at a charity event for those affected by the grenfell tower fire, and meeting fans in australia. iimagine it i imagine it also might be in preparation for an announcement at some point, mightn't it? that would
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be very 2019, wouldn't it? it is eight to 11am. a very good morning to you. —— 8:11am. after months of deadlock, theresa may says she's willing to meetjeremy corbyn to try to find a way out of the brexit impasse. it could mean an end to some of those famous red lines, but labour would also have to offer something in return. let's speak now to the shadow business secretary, rebecca long—bailey. thank you forjoining us. thank you for telling us about the labour perspective on this. we heard from the tories about an hour ago and it depends on the talks in terms of the direction of travel on this. were you surprised by the announcement yesterday? i was quite surprised but i think the prime minister is now backed into a corner. she has no option but to reach out, this is long overdue. it should have happened a long time ago but i'm welcoming the direction she is taking us in now and certainly i think sitting alongside that willingness to discuss things is also a willingness to compromise
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because we have to find some sort of a proposal that will unite both parliament but also the whole of the united kingdom, and that is why jeremy has said very clearly, he is going to approach these discussions with an open mind, he not setting any limitations. we know right across parliament they have to be compromises made and we hope the discussions will be fruitful going forward. give us an idea where we'll jeremy corbyn and the labour party be willing to compromise to try and reach an agreement? well, look, the prime minister already knows our starting point, we have set out a sensible deal and that has been on the table for some time with a customs union and strong single market relationship... you know full well in the same way she will have to change her position and you will have to change yours somewhere. that's right and over the last few weeks we have had a series of indicative votes and we have backed options in parliament that were not our position to try and afford parliament the opportunity to try and find agreement around one option. the customs union, for
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example, the only dummett other day only lost by a few votes so we are willing to work for a compromise and that will be the direction of travel for the whole of parliament going forward. but our main bases is making sure that whatever deal is on the final table is one that protects jobs, the economy and living standards, workers' rights and environmental protections. we need to work clearly around that. i would hope as the prime minister that that's the kind of deal she would be working towards as well. she has said that they will not be any wriggle room over her withdrawal agreement. previously you have said you will not vote for theresa may, what you said terrible deal, are you willing to shift on that if there is something that goes alongside that, compromise about the future relationship with the european union? there are two elements to the deal, the withdrawal agreement which is the divorce package, if you like, and a political declaration intended to set out the future direction of our trade talks with the eu. exactly, will you support that
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withdrawal agreement? there are elements of the withdrawal agreement that need clarification and one of theissues that need clarification and one of the issues i have personally, there is lots of discussion about the backstop and customs union and we are backstop and customs union and we a re clear backstop and customs union and we are clear that we want a permanent customs union. there are other elements in the withdrawal agreement on protection of workers' rights, environmental standards and health and safety standards where it is not clear how the government is going to enshrine in uk law any obligation to make sure we don't fall behind the eu. we have had discussions over the last few months with the government on this. i have put forward a number of proposals and i have been told they will be considered going forward , they will be considered going forward, and i hope that forms part of the discussions theresa may has with jeremy today. because certainly we don't want to leave anybody in the uk in a worse position to their eu counterparts when it comes to protections. i want to get clarity on this, as it currently stands, you would not support that withdrawal agreement? she said that will be pa rt agreement? she said that will be part of the deal. the withdrawal agreement i think that will be provided with a number of assurances. workers' rights,
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environment protection is... you will not support it in its current form? not in its current form and in isolation of the political declaration, it's important to take them as a package. the prime minister tried to force a vote on just the withdrawal agreement recently and i don't think that was helpful because they are part of one package. there is the divorce element and also what our future relationship will look like. if we move relationship will look like. if we m ove o nto relationship will look like. if we move onto the political declaration, as it stands we know it is not legally binding but it forms a basis for the discussions and it lets businesses know what we are working towards. at the moment itjust says we wa nt towards. at the moment itjust says we want to have a close relationship with the eu, in not so many words, that's not good enough, we need to have at least principles upon which we are negotiating over the next few yea rs we are negotiating over the next few years with the eu for a deal that make sure we have as much economic security as we can. it seems that the shift is something towards what looks like a softer brexit, which may include a customs union. what would you say to those who might be watching this morning and shouting out their televisions, saying that
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thatis out their televisions, saying that that is not what was voted for by the majority in 2016? it is a question i am sure that you get asked a lot. how would you respond to that? it is a question of either leaving the european union with a deal, which is our position and that is what we have been trying to argue over the last few years, or it is leaving without a deal. leaving without a deal is very worrying for me on without a deal is very worrying for meona without a deal is very worrying for me on a number of principles, not least manufacturing, and many of our business organisations stated that they will leave the uk, or face significant financial burdens if we don't leave with a decent deal that provides that freedom of movement of goods and services across borders. so it's imperative for me as the shadow business secretary to make sure that we have a strong deal. we have already had the government's economic analysis of leaving without a deal and it's not a very good picture to paint for the future u nfortu nately. picture to paint for the future unfortunately. the same is true if
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we leave with a bad deal. that is why we are using every tool we possibly have to force through a deal that protects jobs, the economy and living standards. and it's got to be done quickly as well, hasn't it? exactly. this has to be hammered out in the next few days. do you know how long the discussions will be? have you spoken about that? will they meet for most of the day? i don't know, i think it will have to be as long as it takes in my view. we appreciate your time. it is 8:17am. it is quite cold out there this morning. carol has evidence. it certainly is, some lying snow across northern england and scotland under snow showers across wales to watch out for first thing. weather watchers have been working ha rd weather watchers have been working hard this morning, you can see this lovely picture from county durham of lying snow, and another beautiful one from powys, some lying snow. and another one from cumbria showing the
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snow falling. that is what has been happening this morning. the amount of snow lying at the moment, in cumbria, some are seeing eight centimetres, aviemore, six. we are embedded in this colder air as represented by the blue. you can see the showers from the speckled cloud. this cloud is producing the rain and snow and has been as we have gone through the night and this morning as well. the whole lot is drifting eastwards, and some of the higher roots further south we are seeing some snow showers. as this moves towards the west through the day and i think towards the west through the day and ithinki towards the west through the day and i think i said east, i meant west. we have strong northerly winds seeing the rain get into northern ireland and then we will see showers develop, developing widely, heavy and thundery with some hail. in some of the heavier ones you could see some winteriness but it won't last. strongest winds in the north and
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west, temperature —wise, below par for the time of year, 7—10, but when you add on the effect of the wind it will feel much colder. so in the north and west where we have the strongest winds it will feel more like two or three degrees. if you arejust stepping out, take something warm with you. you won't regret it. heading through the evening and overnight, the low pressure bringing us this weather sinks south, so the centre will be across parts of ireland and wales. you can see the rotation of cloud and showers and rain around it, under clear skies mist and fog patches will form especially in eastern england and there will be some frost and a risk of slippery surfaces to watch out for. tomorrow, the low pressure continues to sink further south, we still have a huge weather front wrapped around it. so that's still going to be producing some rain across parts of north—east england and scotland with some hill snow. it is drifting once again towards the west, and we still have this circulation of showers across
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the south—west and quarter of the uk and wales. and some of those will be wintry on higher ground. but brighter skies across central and eastern areas with the temperature starting to climb. but still below parfor starting to climb. but still below par for the starting to climb. but still below parfor the time of starting to climb. but still below par for the time of year. as we head into friday, it is not going to be as cold. mostly dry, some sunshine, and into the weekend, what we are looking at is more settled conditions as high pressure takes over but with a north—easterly wind if you're on the east coast next to the north sea they will be more cloud and it will be cooler for you. 0k, cloud and it will be cooler for you. ok, carol, thank you very much. if you're getting a flybe flight this morning you might want to check its not cancelled before you set off for the airport. there have been a number of cancellations this morning. steph's got more on this. it is definitely flying maybe today, which i know is a popular name people have given it in the past. but what we know is that around 24 flights have been cancelled today but we haven't been given the exact figure. they are mainly in and out of belfast but we know about other passengers who have been affected,
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for example, from southampton flying to newcastle, east midlands, glasgow, birmingham, leeds, bradford, aberdeen, amsterdam and bordeaux. we don't know why at the moment. we know that they brought in a new timetable yesterday so perhaps it is problems with the timetable. on the couple of occasions we have spoken to flybe this morning they haven't told us why these cancellations have happened but they keep reassuring us that customers will have received a text or an e—mail to tell them what to do and offer them a refund or to change to another flight. we have offer them a refund or to change to anotherflight. we have had people tell us that the first i have heard of theirflight tell us that the first i have heard of their flight is from us, or from the radio, so 5 live wake up to money, lovely sean talking about it, and various listeners contacted him to say i've only found out because you have told me. so i don't know what's going on. to be honest, i think we need to know more from flybe so i hope at some point... they will call you again? it is us calling them. i feel like
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some kind of ex—girlfriend ringing somebody up! no, it's her again! exactly, but there we are. let it go to answering machine! when you get the answer i'm sure you can tell us. if you are flying with flybe, just check, it is not all flights, lots of people have travelled with flybe this morning at lots of other people who will be fine butjust check. it isa who will be fine butjust check. it is a may be. it will affect some people today? yeah. go and make some more phone calls. he is ringing you again! antimicrobial resistance has been called the 21st century's biggest single threat to human health. it stops drugs like antibiotics from working properly. many believe antibiotics have been over prescribed, and are becoming less effective at killing bacteria. but a team at the university of birmingham believe there may be hope, in the form of honey. as tim muffett reports. i was gravely ill, gravely ill. when debbie contracted a urinary tract infection,
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she assumed antibiotics would take care of it, but things went downhill fast. i developed sepsis, where your body kind of goes into overdrive and it attacks itself. they started pumping antibiotics into me and then as each day passed, they found that antibiotic was not working and i was deteriorating day by day. why weren't those antibiotics working? they found that i had anti—microbial resistance. it is becoming more and more common, which is what the alarming thing is and why they have to do something. anti—microbial resistance is what happens when microorganisms such as these bacteria evolve and antibiotics can no longer kill them. anti—microbial resistance is predicted to kill more people than cancer by 2050, and if we get to the stage where we have no working antibiotics, it would essentially mean the end of modern medicine.
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the research started with a curious question about why bacteria cannot survive in a beehive. one of the main reasons for that is the natural antimicrobial properties of honey. honey has been used as a treatment for infection for centuries, it contains natural antibiotics, which can kill bacteria. the problem is, it's sticky, which means it's very difficult to use in surgery or on a wound. we're taking it from something that is thick and sticky and turning it into sprays, creams and powders, that can be easily applied to lots of different parts of the body. honey—based medical gel has already been developed. the team here want to take that idea further. this is our simulated wound, it's killing the bacteria. here we have our emulsion, that has got the droplets of the honey, and this could be used preventively as well, so before a surgeon makes an incision. would that work potentially as well as an antibiotic prescribed by a doctor? yeah, so this is an alternative to using antibiotics,
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and what is really promising about this honey is that it has already been shown to kill bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as the superbug, mrsa. the sixth antibiotics tried on debbie did work, but she very nearly died and welcomes a different approach to fighting infection. part of the double—edged sword of being a survivor is the fact that so many people do not make it. we have to support research so that we find other methods of treating infections. it's hoped that if funding is found, these products will be brought to medical trial in the next few years. tim muffett, bbc news. it is amazing looking at that, these could be the answer to everything. honey has been around a long time. people use it for different purposes. platypus milk was thought to be one
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of the answers. carlos santana will be here, go back to woodstock 50 yea rs be here, go back to woodstock 50 years on, that will be great. i was telling you earlier, he had an album, 1999 or 2001, which won nine grammy awards just for one album. and also, talking about the nutritional value that men over the age of 40 need to introduce into their lives, various vitamins and foods you can eat, and i know we talk a lot about diet these days, but there are men of a certain age who apparently have terrible diets. if that's you, they could be some news coming your way later on. or perhaps you live with somebody like that. what are you saying? nothing. when you confuse chilli with red wine... iimagined a wine... i imagined a baked potato with chilli and cheese on it. sorry about that. we're counting down to the netball world cup — with an extravaganza just outside our studios here in salford quays. all that still to come, but time now to get
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the news, travel and weather where you are. that is throwing these weather fronts westward. accompanied by strong, northerly wind, so the mixture of the two was giving us some snow across the higher ground of scotla nd some snow across the higher ground of scotland and also northern england. already we have seen up to eight centimetres of snow falling in northern england and east of scotland. in the afternoon that snow will ease off, they will be some brighter weather with rain spreading into northern ireland, still showers across wales in the south—west of england, some snow of a higher rank, showers and the saudis, strong northerly wind in the north—west
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with gusts of up to 60 mph mph expected, and while these temperatures are round about 6—9dc, it will feel colder and that suggests with that northerly wind. sunny spells in central and eastern areas, and through tonight, showers rotating around that area of low pressure as it moves its way to the south—west. remaining unsettled for many of us, with persistent rain in the far north of scotland. another chilly night, temperatures close to if not below freezing. lengthy clear spells. here is this area of low pressure moving down to the south—west. you can see the front across the north of scotland, keeping things unsettled as the air rotates around that area of low pressure for —— so there will be somehow snow in scotland as showers continue in the south—west which could be heavy and thundery with some hail, sleet and wet snow. towards eastern and north—eastern areas of england, largely dry on
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thursday, and temperatures again around nine celsius. by the end of the week, it will not be as cold. it will be mostly dry with some sunshine as well. that's all from me. goodbye.
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